Physical Exercise

It’s common knowledge that children don’t particularly like to sit still and lie in bed for hours on end. This, of course, also applies to our little superheroes at Aladina, who would rather not be stuck inside their hospital rooms, even during those bad days when their illness is particularly challenging.

Numerous studies have confirmed the benefits of physical exercise for pediatric cancer patients, both for treatment and recovery. Professionally supervised regular exercise sessions not only boost their self-esteem, but they also improve their immune systems and minimizes the secondary effects of harsh treatments like chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

Aladina hired a sports and physical activity doctor, Elena Santana, to supervise and personalize all the training sessions for the little ones. Now, nobody wants to miss them! Since the initiative’s launch in 2012, there have been over 300 training sessions held each month.

Dr. Santana also visits the little fighters that are hospitalized in isolation at the Maktub Center. And she’d better not be late! The children anxiously wait for her arrival, because it means they get to momentarily put their hospital routine aside to enjoy something fun and different.

Testimonials

  • "Thank you so much for your work, for giving me exercises to do and spending this time with me, and making...
    "Thank you so much for your work, for giving me exercises to do and spending this time with me, and making me laugh so much. It is great to have people like you in the hospital, as you make our days much easier to bear, and very importantly, you get us doing exercise through games and fun so as not to lose muscle tone. I hope you will be able to carry on working for many years to come, as it is a really important part of our healing process”
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    Mateo, cancer patient, 9 years old
  • "Personally I must say that this has been a unique experience: hard, but very gratifying. I adore seeing...
    "Personally I must say that this has been a unique experience: hard, but very gratifying. I adore seeing the smiles of the children when I visit them in their bedrooms, how they ask me to let them be first for training when they are kept in isolation – or seeing them get angry if I am late. Likewise, for example, I love how they ask me to talk to the doctors about the possibility of getting them a bicycle for the Maktub centre, or to come in and do stretching with them, and even, when they are discharged, how they ask me to come to train with them at home”
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    Elena Santana Sosa, Doctor of Health and Physical Activity
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